MBZUAI Talks Webinars

Biometric Recognition: How do I Know Who You are?

Date: September 1st
Time: 6pm – 7pm GST

Biometric recognition refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their biological and behavioral traits such as fingerprint, face, iris, and voice. The first scientific paper on automated fingerprint matching was published by Trauring (1963). Since then, progress in representation and recognition approaches has enabled biometric systems to accurately recognize individuals in real-time in applications ranging from unlocking personal smartphones to large-scale national ID and law enforcement systems. Despite this progress, a number of challenges and lack of understanding continue to inhibit the full potential of biometrics. In this talk I would like to share with you some of these challenges, requirements, opportunities for basic and applied research, and some ongoing projects in my laboratory.

Speaker: Dr. Anil K Jain

Board Member @ MBZUAI

Moderator: Professor Ling Shao

EVP & Provost @ MBZUAI

 

How Does AI Help Fight the COVID-19 pandemic?

Date: August 4th
Time: 6pm – 7pm GST

There is no doubt that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is becoming an integral part of our everyday life. During the COVID-19 pandemic, AI has been extremely crucial in tackling not only the healthcare consequences of the disease but also other important implications which affect social, economic and policy making decisions. In this talk, I will present some innovative AI solutions which helped fight the pandemic on different scales. I will discuss how and where AI help

  • Detect, respond and recover from the pandemic
  • Predict infection
  • Facilitate healthcare solutions
  • Accelerate research to understand and treat COVID-19

Finally, I will touch on issues which emerge with using AI in fighting the pandemic such as privacy, the need for big data, generalisability of solutions, data noise, and human acceptance.

I illustrate these developments from my own work in: (i) imaging the liver and related organs for (non-alcoholic) fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, liver cancer, and COVID recovery; and (ii) breast cancer. I conclude by looking forward to just a few of the many opportunities that are ripe for development.

Speaker: Dr. Mohammad Yaqub

Computer Vision Department @ MBZUAI

Biometric Recognition: How do I Know Who You are?

Date: September 1st
Time: 6pm – 7pm GST

Biometric recognition refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their biological and behavioral traits such as fingerprint, face, iris, and voice. The first scientific paper on automated fingerprint matching was published by Trauring (1963). Since then, progress in representation and recognition approaches has enabled biometric systems to accurately recognize individuals in real-time in applications ranging from unlocking personal smartphones to large-scale national ID and law enforcement systems. Despite this progress, a number of challenges and lack of understanding continue to inhibit the full potential of biometrics. In this talk I would like to share with you some of these challenges, requirements, opportunities for basic and applied research, and some ongoing projects in my laboratory.

Speaker: Dr. Anil K. Jain 

Board Member @ MBZUAI

Moderator: Professor Ling Shao

EVP & Provost @ MBZUAI

 

How Does AI Help Fight the COVID-19 pandemic?

Date: August 4th
Time: 6pm – 7pm GST

There is no doubt that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is becoming an integral part of our everyday life. During the COVID-19 pandemic, AI has been extremely crucial in tackling not only the healthcare consequences of the disease but also other important implications which affect social, economic and policy making decisions. In this talk, I will present some innovative AI solutions which helped fight the pandemic on different scales. I will discuss how and where AI help

  • Detect, respond and recover from the pandemic
  • Predict infection
  • Facilitate healthcare solutions
  • Accelerate research to understand and treat COVID-19

Finally, I will touch on issues which emerge with using AI in fighting the pandemic such as privacy, the need for big data, generalisability of solutions, data noise, and human acceptance.

I illustrate these developments from my own work in: (i) imaging the liver and related organs for (non-alcoholic) fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, liver cancer, and COVID recovery; and (ii) breast cancer. I conclude by looking forward to just a few of the many opportunities that are ripe for development.

Speaker: Dr. Mohammad Yaqub

Assistant Professor

AI in Medical Imaging: With Examples from Cancer, COVID, and the Metabolic Syndrome

Date: July 7th
Time: 6pm – 7pm GST

Medical imaging has been developing rapidly providing important information to clinicians. It is increasingly quantitative – delivering precise numbers rather than pictures that rely on interpretation by a clinician. AI underpins medical image analysis because: medicine is complex so doctors need assistance; and because doctors are drowning in data when they need information.

I illustrate these developments from my own work in: (i) imaging the liver and related organs for (non-alcoholic) fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, liver cancer, and COVID recovery; and (ii) breast cancer. I conclude by looking forward to just a few of the many opportunities that are ripe for development.

Speaker: Professor Sir Michael Brady

Interim President @ MBZUAI

Moderator: Professor Ling Shao

EVP & Provost @ MBZUAI

 

AI in Medical Imaging: With Examples from Cancer, COVID, and the Metabolic Syndrome

Date: July 7th
Time: 6pm – 7pm GST

Medical imaging has been developing rapidly providing important information to clinicians. It is increasingly quantitative – delivering precise numbers rather than pictures that rely on interpretation by a clinician. AI underpins medical image analysis because: medicine is complex so doctors need assistance; and because doctors are drowning in data when they need information.

I illustrate these developments from my own work in: (i) imaging the liver and related organs for (non-alcoholic) fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, liver cancer, and COVID recovery; and (ii) breast cancer. I conclude by looking forward to just a few of the many opportunities that are ripe for development.

Speaker: Professor Sir Michael Brady

Interim President @ MBZUAI

Moderator: Professor Ling Shao

EVP & Provost @ MBZUAI

 

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